“Fail Well”

A while ago I put up a post that may have gone a little off the deep end. It likened investing to a spiritual journey and drew heavily on the example of Bridgewater Associates.

Barry Ritholtz has a neat Bloomberg View piece up summarizing some takeaways from a recent interview with Bridgewater founder Ray Dalio. I love this thinking and it is why I keep an investing journal:

Throughout the book, and in a recent conversation we had, Dalio insists the key to his turnaround was revisiting failure and learning from it. He is enamored of the framework described in Joseph Campbell’s “The Hero with a Thousand Faces.” Campbell’s book examined the evolution of mythological figures, whose failure leads to discovering new wisdom that they use to achieve their goals. Dalio wanted his failures to have the same results, so he created a broad set of rules to do so:

  • View mistakes as opportunities to improve. He calls this “mistake-based learning.”
  • Own your errors. Never hide them, but bring them forward to create a learning opportunity. His advice is to “fail well.”
  • Pain + reflection = progress. The “pain of failure” should lead to reflection, from which your wisdom derives.
  • Track what you do; keep systemizing what you learn from your mistakes.
  • There are many more principles, but this gives you an idea of some of the basics.

Dalio does things that most ordinary people don’t do. Set aside for a minute his remarkable track record as an investor and note the following unusual business behavior: He writes down and reflects on everything he does. Then he systemizes it, eventually turning these into algorithms that his firm’s computer systems help backtest against earlier eras. The end result of this is a hybrid of human creativity and machine learning that produces results better than either could separately.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s