It’s Just Business

“Your father did business with Hyman Roth, your father respected Hyman Roth, but your father never trusted Hyman Roth.” – Frank Pentangeli, The Godfather, Part II

Frank Pentangeli is one of my favorite characters from The Godfather movies. He’s a lovable, old-fashioned gangster struggling to eke out a living in a brutal and cynical world. Frank’s fatal flaw is that he’s not smart enough to see all the angles. He never fully grasps how completely he’s at the mercy of forces much larger and more powerful than himself. He clings to a code of honor that seems increasingly outmoded as the plot evolves.

And so, it’s fitting that when Pentangeli finally goes out near the end of Part II, it’s not because someone whacks him. It’s because Tom Hagan convinces him the only way to salvage his honor and dignity is to off himself. The scene is one of the best in all three movies.

In Epsilon Theory speak, Frankie Five Angels is a lousy player of the metagame. (h/t to Epsilon Theory for inspiring this post, btw)

godfatherii_tom_frank

Despite Frank’s obvious flaws, his acute sense of personal honor was useful when it came to judging the character of his business partners and counterparties. His most famous line (quoted above) is a testament to the fact you can always choose to do business with someone at arm’s length. Trust is not a prerequisite for a mutually beneficial business relationship.

So it is with the sell-side.

We do business with the sell-side. We respect the sell-side. But we should never, ever, under any circumstance trust the sell-side.

I was moved to reflect on this after another one of those “market outlook” meetings where a “portfolio specialist” (a salesman with his CFA designation) from a big asset manager comes and talks to you about how the next recession is at least a couple years away* and sure there some risks but nonetheless the fundamentals are sound. Oh and by the way have you looked at leveraged loan funds lately?

Sure, leveraged loan covenants suck, and the space is red hot, and investors will get burned eventually. But there’s still a couple years left in the trade.

Sure, high yield looks like a crap deal on a relative basis, but on an absolute basis there’s still a supportive bid for yield from foreign buyers.

Sure, this stock trades rich, but our analysts can see a path higher from here.

How many times have you heard this stuff? Or stuff that rhymes with this?

Our relationship with the sell-side should always and everywhere be a transactional relationship. But the goal of every great salesman is to turn a transactional relationship into a personal relationship. Personal relationships bring with them all kinds of social conventions and obligations. Unless you’re a complete sociopath, it’s nigh on impossible to behave in a transactional manner once a business relationship turns personal.

That doesn’t mean you can’t go to lunch with the sell-side.

It doesn’t mean you can’t use research from the sell-side.

It means you should never, ever under any circumstance allow yourself to believe the helpful guy or gal from the sell-side you have lunch with once a quarter is truly on your side of the table, always and everywhere with your best interests in mind.

If you do this, and you choose to trust these people instead of merely transacting business with them, you will eventually discover that they do not, in fact, sit on the same side of the table as you. They do not, in fact, suffer like you when the bill of goods they’ve sold you blows up.

And it’ll cost you.

*The next recession is always at least a couple years away.

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